Inside Injuries 2022 Fantasy Football Draft Kit

The 2022 NFL season is right around the corner, which means this is the year you finally win your fantasy league. Using advanced metrics, statistical analysis, and algorithmic processing, we have put together a draft kit that is sure to – at the very least – keep you out last place.

Here is a quick breakdown of the metrics we use to rank players.

This draft kit will be updated periodically with more analysis and reports about the players on your scouting report. Throughout the season we will provide extensive coverage on every player you see below. Players are listed by power rankings, with the number next to their name indicating where we have them ranked in their position. For example, we have Ja’Marr Chase as the #3 WR heading into 2022, hence he has the “#3” next to his name. With that being said, let’s get to the analysis!

*ADP is based on a 12-man league

JUMP TO A POSITION GROUP

QUARTERBACKS

#1.) Josh Allen, Buffalo – Over the last two years, one name has risen to the top of the fantasy scoreboards: Josh Allen. The Bills quarterback became the first quarterback since 2003-04 to lead the position in scoring in back-to-back seasons. He’s a bonafide superstar, and this season he may ascend to an even higher constellation.

– Injury Risk: Low (5%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (98%)
– ADP: 2.10

#2.) Justin Herbert, Los Angeles – Chargers QB Justin Herbert has quickly ascended the ranks of quarterback stardom in just two seasons. Along that path, he has rejuvenated a franchise whose fans have long wondered when it was their chance to compete. Heading into 2022, this very well could be the year.

– Injury Risk: Low (4%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (99%)
– ADP: 3.08

#3.) Patrick Mahomes, Kansas City – Kansas City Chiefs QB Patrick Mahomes had a down year by his standards in 2021. The soon-to-be 27 year old threw for 4,839 yards, 37 touchdowns, and a career-high 13 interceptions.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (14%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 4.01

#4.) Joe Burrow, Cincinnati – The Bengals put the world on notice last season thanks to a solid chunk of their offense and defense putting together dominant performances. From Ja’Marr Chase to Trey Hendrickson, both sides of the ball vastly outperformed expectations. There is one name I haven’t mentioned yet, and that was the man leading Cincinnati the whole way: Joe Burrow.

– Injury Risk: High (28.4%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (74.5%)
– ADP: 5.02

#5.) Lamar Jackson, Baltimore – Ravens QB Lamar Jackson has been electric since he entered the league in 2018. There’s no other quarterback like him in the NFL. He has 9+ carries in over 70% of his starts, and each of his four seasons in the NFL are all in the Top 8 of QB carries in the league’s history.

– Injury Risk: Low (7%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (98%)
– ADP: 5.01

#9.) Matthew Stafford, Los Angeles – Rams QB Matthew Stafford joined Los Angeles last year in a blockbuster trade that highlighted the Rams commitment to winning a Super Bowl. Detroit shipped him off in exchange for Jared Goff, a 2021 third-round pick and two first-round picks in 2022 and 2023.

– Injury Risk: High (50.1%)
– Health Performance Factor: Below Average (63%)
– ADP: 7.07

WIDE RECEIVERS

#1.) Cooper Kupp, Los Angeles – Rams WR Cooper Kupp proved his worth last season when he finished the season as the #1 wide receiver, and the #2 player overall. In 2021, Kupp led the league in receptions (145), rec. yards (1947), and rec. touchdowns (16). It was a herculean season that culminated in him winning SBLVI MVP.

– Injury Risk: Low (11.3%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 1.04

#2.) Justin Jefferson, Minnesota – Vikings WR Justin Jeffererson is poised to have another dominant season in 2022. The 23-year-old has already eclipsed 3,000 yards after just two years in the NFL, and I’d expect a new career-high from him this season.

– Injury Risk: Low (6.32%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 1.05

#3.) Ja’Marr Chase, Cincinnati – It didn’t take long for Ja’Marr Chase to become a Top 5 receiver in the league. Detractors will say he still isn’t and it was maybe one lucky season, but anyone who saw the tape will say the evidence is clear.

– Injury Risk: No data available
– Health Performance Factor: No data available
– ADP: 1.09

#4.) Davante Adams, Las Vegas – Davante Adams has shown he is an elite receiver, but he hasn’t done so without the help of Aaron Rodgers, and that will be the focal point of this season. In eight seasons with the Packers, Adams caught 669 passes for 8,121 yards and 73 touchdowns. He earned Pro Bowl selections every year from 2017 to 2021 and two first-team All-Pro selections, in 2020 and 2021 respectively. In the former, he led the league with 98.1 yards per game and 18 receiving touchdowns.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (14.9%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (95.5%)
– ADP: 1.11

#5.) Stefon Diggs, Buffalo – Bills WR Stefon Diggs gave Buffalo fans a good scare when he sent out cryptic tweets after the conclusion of last season. The tweets alluded to loyalty, and Bills mafia grew concerned that the All-Pro receiver may request a trade. But on April 6, Diggs signed a four-year, $96M extension to stay in Upper New York.

– Injury Risk: Low (10.9%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 2.01

#6.) CeeDee Lamb, Dallas – Two years into his career with Dallas, wide receiver CeeDee Lamb still seems to be holding back. That’s not to say he hasn’t been productive – his numbers prove otherwise – rather he hasn’t reached his potential as an elite receiver.

– Injury Risk: Low (12.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (87.9%)
– ADP: 2.04

#7.) Deebo Samuel, San Francisco – Niners (for now) RB/WR Deebo Samuel took the sports world by storm last season, racking up 1,405 yards receiving and 365 yards on the ground. His elite combination of speed, size, route-running, and ball carrier vision earned him 262 fantasy points (#16 overall) and first team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selections.

– Injury Risk: High (30.1%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (82.1%)
– ADP: 2.05

#7.) Tyreek Hill, Miami – They don’t call him “Cheetah” for nothing. Newly acquired Miami WR Tyreek Hill is entering his seventh season this year, and there are no reasons to think he’s slowing down any time soon, but his production could look different.

– Injury Risk: High (26.5%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (77.1%)
– ADP: 2.10

#9.) Mike Evans, Tampa Bay – Tampa Bay WR Mike Evans has been a portrait of consistency throughout his eight seasons in the league thus far. He hasn’t had a season with fewer than 1,000 yards and has scored 10+ times in half of his seasons.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (21%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (93%)
– ADP: 2.12

#10.) Keenan Allen, Los Angeles – Chargers WR Keenan Allen has steadily produced impressive numbers throughout his nine year career, with his most recent five earning him Pro Bowl selections. Across those five seasons, Allen averaged 102 receptions, 1,184 yards, and six touchdowns.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (16.9%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (96%)
– ADP: 3.03

#11.) A.J. Brown, Philadelphia – The 2019 second-round pick has put together a solid portfolio as a Top 20 receiver, with 2,995 receiving yards and 24 touchdowns on 185 receptions. Despite the success, people who have followed Brown closely will agree that there appears to be some level of yet untapped potential inside of him. Perhaps the change of scenery can bring it out.

– Injury Risk: High (25.2%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (89.2%)
– ADP: 3.04

#13.) Tee Higgins, Cincinnati – Bengals WR Tee Higgins saw solid improvement in 2021 following an already good rookie season in 2020. For Cincinnati last year, Higgins totaled 74 receptions for 1,091 yards and six touchdowns. He may have been outshined by rookie sensation Ja’Marr Chase, but Higgins’ profile as a receiver is impressive nonetheless.

– Injury Risk: High (35%)
– Health Performance Factor: Below Average (55%)
– ADP: 3.07

#19.) Mike Williams, Los Angeles – Chargers WR Mike Williams signed a three-year, $60 million contract extension in the offseason following his breakout 2021 campaign where he set career highs in receptions (76), targets (129), and yards (1,146) while scoring nine touchdowns.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (21%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (95%)
– ADP: 5.01

#22.) Chris Godwin, Tampa Bay – Buccaneers wide receiver Chris Godwin suffered a torn ACL in Week 15 of the 2021 season, bringing what had been a productive year to a screeching halt. He finished with a career-high 98 receptions, proving he had earned Tom Brady’s trust. And earning Brady’s trust meant Godwin was in for a payday, which meant the Bucs had to franchise tag him. The two sides eventually came to an agreement on a three-year, $60 million contract extension

– Injury Risk: High (45.7%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (73.7%)
– ADP: 5.08

RUNNING BACKS

1.) Jonathan Taylor, Indianapolis – Colts running back Jonathan Taylor had an MVP-caliber season in 2021. In his sophomore year he tallied 332 carries (1st in the NFL), 1811 yards (1st),  and 18 TDs (1st) on the ground. He was also serviceable as a receiving target, bringing in 36 catches, 299 yards, and one touchdown. His 333 fantasy points ranked fifth in the league, while his VBD (187) was first, as was his overall year-end ranking.

– Injury Risk: Low (6.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 1.01

2.) Christian McCaffrey, Carolina – Panthers RB Christian McCaffrey is one of the best and most impactful players in pro football…when healthy. As a team Carolina won just five games last season, and he was active in four of those. Still just 26 years old, McCaffrey played in only 10 games over the previous two seasons. In 2020 he was limited to three games due to a combination of ankle and shoulder injuries. Then, last year, he played in only seven games thanks to ankle and hamstring issues.

– Injury Risk: High (26%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (88.3%)
– ADP: 1.02

3.) Derrick Henry, Tennessee – Titans RB Derrick Henry played in just eight games last season, but still he managed to put up 937 yards on 219 carries, averaging 117.1 yards-per-game. If he were healthy for the full season and maintained that average, Henry would have totalled 1990 rushing yards.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (15.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (93.1%)
– ADP: 1.04

4.) Austin Ekeler, Los Angeles – Heading into 2021, Chargers RB Austin Ekeler was a question mark on most people’s draft boards. The 27-year-old had shown flashes in the years prior, but an injury-riddled 2020 season opened the door for doubt to creep in. This year, that’s not the case.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (16.2%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (92.8%)
– ADP: 1.05

5.) Najee Harris, Pittsburgh – If you want a workhorse RB this season, look no further. In his rookie season last year, Pittsburgh running back Najee Harris ran the ball a league-leading 381 times. The only other player to eclipse 350 touches? Jonathan Taylor. He also shared the running back-lead for targets with Austin Ekeler (94).

– Injury Risk: Low (0.27%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 1.07

6.) Dalvin Cook, Minnesota – Vikings RB Dalvin Cook possesses a unique combination of strength and speed that can dismantle any defense. The problem is that he has been limited by injuries throughout much of his career. In five years with Minnesota, Cook has yet to play a full season. In spite of that, he’s earned Pro Bowl honors in three straight seasons.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (16.1%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (93.6%)
– ADP: 1.08

7.) D’Andre Swift, Detroit – Lions RB D’Andre Swift has shown flashes of the explosiveness he was known for at UGA, but in two seasons with Detroit he hasn’t been consistent. It’s fair to say last season was an interesting one for the Lions, which particularly impacted Swift.

– Injury Risk: Low (9.6%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (96.5%)
– ADP: 1.12

8.) Joe Mixon, Cincinnati – Bengals running back Joe Mixon has been a consistent presence in the Bengals offense and often doesn’t get the credit he deserves. In five seasons, he’s recorded 4,564 rushing yards, 33 rushing touchdowns, 1,104 carries, 171 receptions, 1,322 receiving yards, and eight receiving touchdowns.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (14.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (93.3%)
– ADP: 1.10

9.) Nick Chubb, Cleveland – In four seasons with the Browns, Chubb has established himself as a franchise back who has an elite combination of strength and speed. He’s been a Pro Bowler for three consecutive seasons and was named to the PFWA All-Pro first team in 2021 after tallying 1,259 yards and eight touchdowns on 228 carries in 14 games.

– Injury Risk: Low (10.6%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (96.6%)
– ADP: 2.02

10.) Aaron Jones, Green Bay – Packers RB Aaron Jones has been a highly efficient, dual threat back since entering the league in 2014. He tallied 448 rushing yards and just 22 receiving yards in his first season, splitting time in the backfield with fellow rookie Jamaal Williams.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (13%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (94%)
– ADP: 2.03

12.) Javonte Williams, Denver – Broncos RB Javonte Williams exceeded expectations last season as a rookie. Denver already had Melvin Gordon, which meant Williams would have to settle for RB2. It was assumed that Gordon would receive the lion’s share of both carries and yards, but Williams took advantage of seemingly every opportunity he got, giving the Broncos no choice but to get him more involved in the offense halfway through the season.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (18.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (86.8%)
– ADP: 2.09

13.) Saquon Barkley, New York – Giants RB Saquon Barkley has the opportunity to prove his doubters wrong this season, but for that to happen, a lot needs to go right. His 2018 rookie season was electrifying, and made the Giants front office look smart for taking a running back with the second overall pick. That year, he put up 1,307 rushing yards while totaling 2,028 from scrimmage, leading the league.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (14%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (94.6%)
– ADP: 2.07

14.) Leonard Fournette, Tampa Bay – Buccaneers RB Leonard Fournette made headlines recently when he arrived at training camp over what the team has deemed a good weight for him. Reports have estimated he is as heavy as 260 pounds, which is 30 pounds heavier than what he played at last season. It’s safe to assume he will shed weight as Week 1 approaches and he gears up to improve on his 2021 campaign.

– Injury Risk: Low (10.4%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (96.1%)
– ADP: 2.12

15.) Ezekiel Elliot, Dallas – Dallas RB Ezekiel Elliot is entering his seventh season in the league, and while he’s been productive in the lone star state, he’s yet to recapture the success of his rookie year.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (19.4%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (88.3%)
– ADP: 3.03

17.) James Conner, Arizona – Arizona RB James Conner had an electric season in 2021, tallying 18 total touchdowns and 1,127 yards from scrimmage. He led the league in total touchdowns for a healthy portion of the season, but finished third after late-season surges by both Austin Ekeler and Jonathan Taylor.

– Injury Risk: High (25%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (89%)
– ADP: 3.08

18.) J.K. Dobbins, Baltimore – Ravens RB J.K. Dobbins had his 2021 season stolen by a torn ACL just ahead of Week 1. By all accounts, he was primed for a breakout campaign after earning the top spot in the depth chart during the offseason.

– Injury Risk: Low (7.2%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (90.2%)
– ADP: 3.11

20.) Cam Akers, Los Angeles – Rams RB Cam Akers defied all expectations last year when he returned in Week 15 after tearing his achilles in the offseason. It was an injury that should have kept him out of the 2021-22 season, but Akers wasn’t hearing it.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (18.8%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (84.2%)
– ADP: 3.10

21.) Antonio Gibson, Washington – Commanders RB Antonio Gibson had a stellar sophomore season in 2021, finishing in the Top 10 of fantasy scorers at the position. While his efficiency numbers did drop a little, his snap count shot up by 14% as he saw an additional 199 snaps, so a regression of some sort was expected.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (23%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (76%)
– ADP: 4.05

22.) Elijah Mitchell, San Francisco – San Francisco RB Elijah Mitchell was one of the 2021 NFL season’s biggest surprises. A 6th round pick out of Louisiana-Lafayette, Mitchell was supposed to be the Niners third-string option. But in Week 1 against the Lions, he put the team on notice by racking up 104 yards on 19 attempts, averaging 5.4 yards per carry.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (18%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (90%)
– ADP: 4.07

33.) James Robinson, Jacksonville – The Jacksonville Jaguars have a lot to look forward to in the post-Urban Meyer era, one of which is RB James Robinson. While he didn’t have the most spectacular 2021 season, Robinson is still a young running back on a young team that can produce when given the opportunity. His rookie year in 2020 was a shock to everyone when he put up 1,070 yards on the ground after going undrafted.

– Injury Risk: High (45.1%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (75.5%)
– ADP: 7.07

Tight Ends

1.) Travis Kelce, Kansas City – Another year, another season Travis Kelce is the #1 tight end in the NFL. For six straight seasons he’s put up over 1,000 receiving yards, totaling 7,269 yards and 47 receiving touchdowns in that span. He is as reliable as they come, and has broken multiple tight end records, but this season things could be different. Kansas City traded away Patrick Mahomes’ top target in Tyreek Hill, replacing him with JuJu Smith-Schuster, Marquez Valdes-Scantling, and Skyy Moore.

– Injury Risk: Low (11.6%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (95.4%)
– ADP: 2.03

2.) Mark Andrews, Baltimore – Ravens tight end Mark Andrews broke out in a major way last season, totalling over 1,300 receiving yards and scoring nine touchdowns. To the Baltimore faithful and the statistically inclined, this was no surprise given how well he’s performed for them since getting drafted in 2018.

– Injury Risk: Low (7%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 2.12

3.) George Kittle, San Francisco – 49ers TE George Kittle has been one of the highest scoring options at the position since 2018 when he exploded onto the scene. It was just his second year in the league, but he played like a veteran as he racked up 1,377 receiving yards, breaking Travis Kelce’s single-season receiving yards record for a tight end, less than an hour after Kelce set it.

– Injury Risk: High (33%)
– Health Performance Factor: Above Average (79%)
– ADP: 4.01

4.) Kyle Pitts, Atlanta – Second-year TE Kyle Pitts has all the tools needed to be a top fantasy tight end choice, but the question is if his offense can support him more than they did in 2021.

– Injury Risk: Low (4%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (99%)
– ADP: 4.02

5.) Darren Waller, Las Vegas – After two lackluster years in Baltimore, TE Darren Waller dazzled in his second year with the Raiders in 2019, putting up 1,145 receiving yards in his breakout campaign.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (14%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (94%)
– ADP: 4.11
6.) T.J. Hockenson, Detroit – Lions TE T.J. Hockenson is entering his fourth season in the league, and has shown flashes of an elite skill set that could catapult him to the upper echelon of the position this season.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (16%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 6.02
8.) Dallas Goedert, Philadelphia – Eagles TE Dallas Goedert stepped up in a big way last season after being named the team’s starting tight end in October. The 27 year old saw career highs in receiving yards (830), yards per reception (14.8), and yards per target (10.9) as part of the improved Philadelphia offense.

– Injury Risk: Elevated (16%)
– Health Performance Factor: Peak (97%)
– ADP: 6.02

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